2019 Cycling Allocation – 1.26% Transport Capital Budget?

Investment in cycling is difficult to estimate. Central government provides funding, local government provides funding, other government bodies provide funding and some infrastructure and/or finance is provided by developers as part of planning conditions.

Irish cycling advocates have long been interested in the level of investment by central government but even there the exact level is difficult to uncover. Efforts by different politicians and parties to find out through parliamentary questions  were unsuccessful with replies carefully crafted to avoid answering the questions. The Minister has made periodic statements about funding both inside and outside the Dáil  but cycling is lumped in with walking or the Minister talks in terms of sustainable travel which also includes investment in buses and trains. If you were to ask most Irish politicians “How much does the government spend on cycling?” – they would have no idea. In countries with high levels of cycling, politicians do know – perhaps not expenditure in a specific year but they have a headline figure which the government aims for.

In Ireland, expenditure in the Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport is subdivided into five programmes – (1) Land Transport, (2) Civil Aviation, (3) Maritime Transport and Safety, (4) Sports and Recreational Services and (5) Tourism Services. Of these, Land Transport is the most important area receiving over 90% of the total budget.

The table below gives a breakdown of Land Transport expenditure for 2018. The figures are taken from the Revised Estimates Volume for Public Services 2018 which was published in December 2017. In the future, these will be reclassified as provisional figures before the actual expenditure outturns are finalised, as shown in the annual Appropriation Accounts. The government provides a similar level of detail on expenditure for all departments but does not give a breakdown of expenditure at  lower levels.

2018 Current Non Pay Current Pay Pension Capital Grand Total
 B.1 – Administration – Pay 12,460 12,460
 B.2 – Administration – Non Pay 2,237 295 2,532
 B.3 – Road Improvement/maintenance 72,207 19,160 2,130 815,356 908,853
 B.4 – Road Safety Agencies & Expenses 1,853 2,774 139 350 5,116
 B.5 – Vehicle And Driver Licencing Expenses 15,900 3,500 19,400
 B.6 – Carbon Reduction 5,500 5,500
 B.7 – Public Service Provision Payments 281,713 18,650 300,363
 B.8 – Public & Sustainable Transport Investment Programme 1,605 398,940 400,545
 B.9 – Public Transport Agencies & Expenses 2,819 2,830 11 5,660
 B.10 – Miscellaneous Services 78 78
Total €378,412 €37,224 €2,280 €1,242,591 €1,660,507

TABLE 1       Land Transport Expenditure 2018  (€ 000)
                     (Source: Databank Department of Public Expenditure & Reform)

Most areas in Land Transport receive negligible capital investment. The two which stand out are Road Improvement/Maintenance at €815M (or 65% of the total) and Public & Sustainable Transport Investment Programme at €398 (or 32.1% of the total).  This clearly demonstrates the disparity between the capital allocation for roads as opposed to all other modes of transport including cycling.

Public Transport & Sustainable Transport is the main source of funding for cycling. However, funding for cycling  is also provided under other programmes. For example, in 2018 greenways were funded under the Tourism programme while investment in a velodrome appeared under Sport. This article  concentrates on the departmental funding of cycling from Public Transport & Sustainable Transport but also includes Greenways.

We have identified eight areas of expenditure which involve provision for cycling but the same funding may also be used to provide for other modes of transport. In order to estimate the contribution to cycling alone, it is necessary to separate/estimate what proportion of funding goes to cycling and what goes elsewhere.

  1. Bus Connect

Expenditure on Bus Connect is estimated at €79M in 2018. The primary reason for this expenditure is the need to reorganise the bus service. It is considered reasonable that a proportion should be allocated to cycling as the project includes the provision of segregated cycle facilities on part of the Bus Connect network. It was decided to proportion 10% for cycling as that is the government target for cycling. There are grounds for arguing that 10% is too high and other arguments that 10% is too low but as Bus Connect is a new project, it was decided that 10% was reasonable until its outcome in relation to the provision of cycling infrastructure is clear.

  1.  Cycling/Walking

Cycling/Walking has been allocated €8M in 2018 rising to €15 in 2019. In the absence of any further information from the Department, it was considered reasonable to divide the allocation 50:50 betweeen the two modes.

  1.  Sustainable Transport  Mobility Grants (STMG)

STMG has been allocated €14M in 2018. It may be thought that a large percentage goes to cycling but STMG also includes public transport and walking projects. The proportion of 25% was estimated on the basis of the NTA Outturn Reports.

  1.  Smarter Travel Workplaces

The allocation for Smarter Travel Workplace is estimated at €0.60M per annum. Again, it is an area which includes other modes of transport with cycling only accounting for 33% of expenditure.

  1.  Green Schools

The allocation for Green Schools is also modest at €1.65M but once more the proportion which is spent on cycling is low. The proportion of 33% was estimated from Annual Reports from Green Schools.

  1.  Greenways

Greenways are funded under the Tourism heading and are primarily for recreational reasons as public lighting is not generally provided and Waterways Ireland insist on a low quality dust surface which deters many utility and sport cyclists. Greenways, if constructed to a high standard, have the potential to cater for utility cyclists. Therefore, it was thought fair to include their expenditure in order to estimate overall departmental spending on cycling.

  1.  Cycle Right

All funding for Cycle Right goes to cycling.

  1.  Bikeweek

All funding for Bikeweek goes to cycling.

A breakdown of Department funding for cycling for the years 2018-2021 is given in the Table 2. Some of the funding is current rather than capital spending but has been included to get an overall figure for Department spend.

 Area of Expenditure 2018  2019  2020  2021 TOTAL 
Bus Connect
Bus Connect €79.00 €143.00 €246.00 €282.00 €750.00
Cycling Contribution (10%) €7.90 €14.30 €24.60 €28.20 €75.00
Cycling/Walking
Cycling/Walking €8.00 €15.00 €35.00 €52.00 €110.00
Cycling Contribution (50%) €4.00 €7.50 €17.50 €26.00 €55.00
STMG
STMG €14.00 €17.00 €47.00 €57.00 €135.00
STMG Cycling Contribution (25%) €3.50 €4.25 €11.75 €14.00 €33.75
Smarter Travel Workplaces
Smarter Travel Workplaces €0.60 €0.60 €0.60 €0.60 €2.40
STW Cycling Contribution (33%) €0.20 €0.20 €0.20 €0.20 €0.79
Green Schools
Green Schools €1.65 €1.65 €1.65 €1.65 €6.60
Green Schools Cycling Contribution (20%) €0.33 €0.33 €0.33 €0.33 €1.32
Cycle Right
Cycle Right (100%) €0.65 €0.65 €0.65 €0.65 €2.60
Greenways – Tourism
Greenways €0.00 €13.45 €15.2 €24.35 €53.00
Greenways Cycling Contribution (50%) €0.00 €6.73 €7.60 €12.18 €26.5
Bikeweek
Bikeweek (100%) €0.40 €0.40 €0.40 €0.40 €1.60
DTTAS Expenditure on Cycling €16.98 €34.36 €63.03 €81.96 €196.31

TABLE 2       Departmental Allocation & Contribution to Cycling 2018-2021 (€ M)

In 2018, total expenditure is estimated at €16.98M rising to €34.36M in 2019. The #Allocate4Cycling campaign seeks 10% of the Land Transport Capital budget to be devoted to cycling. As the Land Transport capital budget is estimated at €1243M and €1544M in 2018 and 2019 respectively, this level of expenditure on cycling equates to 1.37% and 2.22% for those years – a long way from what is required to significantly impact on health, congestion, sustainability and climate change.

Of the eight areas of expenditure, the total allocation for four (Smarter Travel Workplaces, Green Schools, Cycle Right and Bikeweek) is negligible at €1.6M per annum. The allocations for Greenways and Cycling/Walking are significant  but most of the funding is in the latter years of the investment programme which shows a lack of priority by the Minister. While he did announce greenway funding of €53M in 2018, no significant if any funding will be spent this year as councils have until November to make an application for schemes. Furthermore, it is assumed that 50% of the Cycling/Walking allocation is for cycling.  In theory it could be anything between 0.1% and 99.9% and still accord with statements by the Minister.

  2018 2019 2020
DTTAS Expenditure on Cycling €9.08 €19.45 €39.40
DTTaS Total Capital Voted Expenditure €1,243.00 €1,544.42 €1,934.52
% Cycling 0.73% 1.26% 2.04%

TABLE 3       % of Departmental Expenditure on Cycling 2018-2020
                      Excluding Bus Connect (€ M)

By far,  the largest area of expenditure  is  the  Bus Connect  project with  contributions to cycling of €7.9M  and  €14.3M in  2018   and  2019.  It  hardly  needs  to be pointed out  that  Bus Connect is  running into problems politically with very vocal opposition to the proposed reorganisation  of bus  routes. If  there  are delay to  routes,  no preliminary  or  detailed designs  can proceed  so it is more than  likely  that any expenditure  on cycling  routes adjacent  to key bus routes  will not  happen  until  the end of  2019  or later.  If  so,  the proportion of  Land Transport capital expenditure allocated to cycling in 2018 and 2019 could fall as low as 0.73% and 1.30% respectively (see Table 3) and  this for a mode of transport which is used for more than 40% of journeys in many Dutch and Danish cities. The Minister has been quoted as saying that his Department “gets” cycling. Unless there is openness on his intended levels of investment,  its impact on levels of cycling  AND a commitment to substantial funding, cycle advocates will continue to disagree.

PS      For  comparison,  Finland,  which  is  similar  in  population  to  Ireland,  has  just announced funding of  €23M for a single cycle project,  albeit the most expensive in its history.

 

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OPENING UP OF CARTON WALK – A POSITIVE DEVELOPMENT FOR MAYNOOTH

Rear_View copy

The Carton Walk Preservation Society (CWPS) has recently commented on the new cycling and walking link from Limetree Hall to the adjacent Carton Walk.

In particular, a spokesperson has been reported as stating that no-one would want a cycle link. Maynooth Cycling Campaign strongly support the provision of cycle facilities between the residential estates and Main Street as it would be a safe route for children attending the nearby school. The alternative route on the Dublin Road has no cycle facilities and would involve a road crossing. Judging from the above photograph, the pupils at Presentation Girls School would appear to agree with our view.

The CWPS also argue that there has been no consultation on the proposal. The proposed walking/cycling link was shown in the Maynooth Local Area Plan 2013–2019 which went to public consultation and was subsequently approved by county councillors. The work is not of a scale which warrants a separate public consultation so Kildare County County got it right this time. Opposition to improved walking and cycling is both mean spirited and detrimental to a more active community.

10% of Land Transport Budget – #Allocate4Cycling

budget submission_Twitter Photo

Cyclist.ie members, including Maynooth Cycling Campaign, have put together a strong budget submission addressed to Minister for Finance & Public Expenditure Paschal Donohue, outlining the deficiency in government funding supports to enable cycling to grow. Essentially we are calling for an immediate 10% of Land Transport Funding to be allocated to Cycling, to enable the government to meet its own target of 10% of modal share by cycling by 2020. Currently the modal share stands at only approximately 3% of trips by bike, and funding levels are at approximately 2% of Land Transport Funding!

The Cyclist.ie submission points out that the appropriate funding for cycling aligns with numerous government policies and initiatives across a variety of sectors such as Transport, Environment, Climate Change, Health, Business, and Education. Cycling, as a mode of transport, offers numerous well documented benefits to society, including:

  • Improved public health
  • Reduced congestion
  • Reduced greenhouse gas emissions
  • Reduced air and noise pollution
  • More liveable and sociable streets and communities, and
  • High rates of economic return

Unlocking these benefits requires targeted and sustained investment, and international evidence demonstrates that investing in cycling provides excellent value for money.

From available data we estimate that spending on cycling currently only amounts to approximately 2% of Transport capital spending. This compares to recommended targets of 10% for cycling, and present European levels of between 5% and 8%. This very low proportion is not commensurate with the benefits offered by cycling, or with the significant economic costs which car dependence imposes on Irish society. To encourage people to make more journeys by bicycle;

We call for 10% of the capital budget for land transport to be invested in cycling.

At the same time, an increase in current spending on a range of different objectives which can support a transition to a cycling friendly society is also required.

The full budget submission is available here and a short summary document here. We need YOU to contact your local representatives and make the case to increase funding for cycling. See https://www.whoismytd.com/ for the names and contact details of your local TDs.

IT NEEDS TO HAPPEN NOW!

MAYNOOTH CYCLING CAMPAIGN NOTES – SEPTEMBER 2018

Amendment No. 1 to Maynooth LAP

Maynooth Cycling Campaign supports Amendment No. 1 to Local Area Plan as it will allow for development of the ring road between the Celbridge and the Dublin Roads and facilitate the development of housing which is badly needed by many families. However, we made a number of points in a submission, two of which  may not be universally supported.

One was in relation to ‘decoupling’ of the modes which in plain English means increasing the safety of vulnerable road users  on the Straffan Road by diverting motorised traffic onto the Ring Road. It would also have the effect of improving Main Street by reducing motorised traffic and creating a more pleasant environment there for pedestrians and cyclists. Such traffic management has been part of the road safety strategy in the Netherlands since the 1970s.

The second point was that Maynooth Cycling Campaign strongly supported the  proposed permeable walking and cycling links between the Railpark area and the existing Rockfield and Parklands residential estates. Streets were historically developed which would allow direct routes for pedestrians. The proposed permeable  links complement the existing links of estates in Maynooth such as Parklands/Rockfield and Kingsbry/Beaufield. Maynooth is fortunate as many estates elsewhere in Kildare are completely segregated from one another as a result of pro-car layouts ie cul-de-sacs.

Dublin CyclingWorks

Last year, there was protests by some small business owners about the reallocation of road space from car parking  to the provision of cycling facilities in Naas town centre. Co-incidentally, the Dublin CyclingWorks website (https://dublin.cyclingworks.org/) was recently set up so that so that business leaders could show their support for the provision of high quality cycling infrastructure by calling for greater government investment in the Greater Dublin Cycle Network which includes Kildare. To date more than fifty businesses have come out in support including Trinity College Dublin, Dublin Institute of Technology, Goodbody, Workday, Siemens, CRBE, CPE and Dublin Chamber.  This was to reinforce the message that cycling is good for business and that most businesses, large and small, support increased cycling.

Velo-City 2019

Velo-City 2018 which took place in Rio de Janeiro is over. Next year the international bike conference is coming back to Ireland . Planning has already started and the organisers of Velo-City 2019, the European Cycling Federation and Dublin City Council, has issued a call for submissions on the theme of Cycling for the Ages by October 22nd. So if anyone has ideas about promoting cycling, more information is available at https://www.velo-city2019.com/abstract .

Climate Change

The Climate Change Advisory Council’s (CCAC) Annual Report 2018 was published at the end of July. The CCAC’s role is to advise the government rather than to specify detailed policy decisions but there was explicit mention of the contribution of increased cycling to reduce the effects of climate change. Chairperson John Fitzgerald speaking at the launch of the report said -“Emissions are rising…we need major policy changes…government has not laid out pathways to decarbonise.”

Maynooth Cycling Campaign is a non-party political cycling advocacy group. Further information on meetings and activities is available on our website.

We are affiliated to Cyclist.ie, the Irish Cyclist Advocacy Network and through it to the European Cycling Federation.

 

MAYNOOTH CYCLING CAMPAIGN NOTES – AUGUST 2018

ANOTHER KILDARE CYCLIST FATALITY

Another cycling fatality has occurred in Kildare with the recent death of 16 year old  Shane Duggan near Straffan. Our thoughts are with his family at this tragic time.

It is a matter of anger to cyclists that even before a fatal accident investigation has been completed, sloppy journalists continue to report such events as a bike/cyclist colliding with a car.  To give them their due, the Leinster Leader correctly reported it as the cyclist being involved in a collision with a car. It is only a minor point but the former subtly suggests that the cyclist is at fault whereas several studies in various countries have found that driver error is to blame in most cases. The report of a collision also refer to a car  as if the car driver is not a party to the collision. Even more insensitive, reports also regularly state that the driver of the car was unhurt which is hardly news in the case of a collision between a car and a cyclist.

MINISTER OPENS MAYNOOTH “CYCLE’ LINK

On Monday 2nd July, Shane Ross, Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport came to Kildare to open the “Maynooth Harbour Cycle Link”. After the opening ceremony, some of us had the opportunity for a short discussion with the Minister. We raised the issues of increased funding, MPDL and compulsory use of cycle lanes. The Minister felt that cyclists didn’t appreciate the efforts he has been making on our behalf and that the 10% funding for cycling was   so at least he is aware of our goal. He also informed us that the legislation on the compulsory use of cycle lanes had not yet been prepared.

The part between Maynooth and Athlone is now largely complete except for two short stretches in Kildare which will be completed before the end of 2018 and the final stretch in County Meath which will be completed in the spring of 2019. This will form part of the Euro-Velo Capitals Route (EV2) which runs all the way from Moscow to Dublin, a distance of some 5,500km.

There were few bicycles at the opening  – most belonged to Cyclist.ie members. A bicycle did appear for the ribbon cutting ceremony but quickly disappeared afterwards. Despite the lovely weather, the official party did not see fit to actually walk or cycle the greenway. Once again a case of “Do As I Say And Not As I Do”.

REMOVAL OF CYCLE FACILITIES MAIN STREET

Work on removing off-road cycle facilities on Main Street is due to begin in August with the Council dismissing concerns of councillors. At the time of the Part 8 Public Consultation, a number of the councillors expressed concerned at the impact on children cycling to Presentation Girls School and on cyclists accessing premises on Main Street. Instead all cyclists are expected to “share the road”. Unfortunately, most people refuse to cycle on roads with traffic levels in excess of 2000 vehicles per day. As Main Street has about 10 times this volume of traffic and there is less space for cycling on the road with so much motorised vehicles, many cyclists will continue to cycle off road. The view of Maynooth Cycling is that the existing facilities are substandard and not continuous. instead of removing cycle facilities, Kildare County Council should upgrade them.

Maynooth Cycling Campaign is a non-party political cycling advocacy group. Further information on meetings and activities is available on our website.

We are affiliated to Cyclist.ie, the Irish Cyclist Advocacy Network and through it to the European Cycling Federation.

MAYNOOTH CYCLING CAMPAIGN NOTES JULY 2018

Bikeweek 2018

The Tour of the Dead to historic graveyards around Maynooth took place on a day with almost perfect weather and we had a lovely cycle to Laraghbryan, Ladychapel and Taghadoe. We were delighted to have the opportunity to show the film Why We Cycle about the Dutch cycling culture and appreciated the attendance of Maynooth MD councillors Padraig McEvoy (Ind), Teresa Murray (Ind) and Tim Durkan (FG) but the general attendance was disappointing. On Bike to Work Day, we gave out chocolates to cyclists on their way to work. We were also involved in organising prizes for a number of the Maynooth primary schools. Some had taken part in a Biodiversity Visit to the Royal Canal with Karen Moore. Presentation Girls school deserves special mention for the way that the school was decorated with fantastic paintings and drawings for Bikeweek. The second weekend saw the Family Cycle to Kilcock with nearly 40 cyclists, young and old, cycling along the Royal Canal Greenway. At Kilcock the children, some young and some not so young, were rewarded with an ice cream. So that was Bikeweek 2018. Roll on next year!

Statement on Cycling from Garda Assistant Commissioner

A less enjoyable aspect of Bikeweek was the disappointing comments on cyclists and cycling from Assistant Commissioner David Sheahan of the Garda National Roads Policing Division. In a statement, he described cycling as a ‘pastime’ and went on to state that cyclists should have brakes, tyres and chain. For everyday cyclists, cycling is not a pastime – it is a mode of transport and it is doubtful that many cyclists take a bike out without tyres or a chain! The Assistant Commissioner also stated that cyclists should never cycle more than two abreast which demonstrates an ignorance of the Road Traffic legislation as it is not illegal to cycle three abreast. If a senior Garda officer has such a distorted view of cycling, it is hardly surprising that the Gardaí fail to prosecute drivers who park on cycle lanes and who endanger cyclists.

Royal Canal Greenway/EuroVelo Route 2

On 2nd July, Shane Ross, the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport will be coming to Maynooth to open a section of the Royal Canal/Eurovelo Route 2 between Maynooth and the Westmeath border – another piece of the jig-saw puzzle between Moscow and Galway. Cyclists will then be able to cycle all the way from Maynooth to Athlone. You can find out progress on the rest of the route at http://www.eurovelo.com/en/eurovelos/eurovelo-2 .

On the same day, the Glenroyal Hotel will host a Capacity Building Workshop to explore the opportunities in developing trails on and along the Royal Canal. It promises to be a bright future for north Kildare.

Climate Change

Another report pointed out the failure of government to live up to Irish commitments on reduction of greenhouse gases. In a ranking of EU countries’ ambition and progress in fighting climate change by Climate Action Network (CAN), Ireland was ranked 27th out of 28.

Niamh Garvey, head of policy and advocacy with Trócaire (which is a member of CAN), commented “This report reaffirms what we know, that political leadership is urgently needed to turn Ireland’s record around on climate change”.

Vulnerable Road Users and Anti-Cyclist Bias

The vulnerability of pedestrians and cyclists on Irish roads and the ‘normality’ of road fatalities was once again demonstrated. In a recent week, nine people were killed including three pedestrians, two of which were hit and run collisions. On The Journal twitter account, eight news reports about the fatal crashes generated 65 comments. However, one article on cyclists generated 272 comments.

Kildare Gardai on Two Wheels

Hopefully, it wasn’t just the good weather, but a member of the Gardaí has been recently seen cycling around Maynooth which is welcomed by Maynooth Cycling Campaign. It is proposed that more Gardai will be taking to the streets across Kildare on bike patrol.

Finally Good News on Infrastructure

Finally some good news on cycling infrastructure but not in Kildare. Due to increasing congestion in Dublin City, the National Transport Authority has announced major plans to improve bus services and at the same time to introduce the next generation network of cycling facilities in the capital. In time, this will lead to higher quality cycle infrastructure in Kildare – hopefully sooner rather than later.

And more good news – after their original design met with scathing criticism, consultants for Dublin City have redesigned the Clontarf-Amiens cycle corridor and the revised scheme has been warmly welcomed by cyclist representatives.

Maynooth Cycling Campaign is a non-party political cycling advocacy group. Further information on meetings and activities is available on our website.
We are affiliated to Cyclist.ie, the Irish Cyclist Advocacy Network and through it to the European Cycling Federation.

MAYNOOTH CYCLING CAMPAIGN NOTES JUNE 2018

BIKEWEEK 2018

This year Bikeweek runs from 9th to 17th June and once again Maynooth  Cycling Campaign has organised a number of events to mark the occasion. On June 10th our historic cycle is the Tour of the Dead – visiting a number of the historic graveyards surrounding Maynooth. On Sunday 17th, the Family Cycle will be to Kilcock on the new Royal Canal Greenway. Both events start at 2:30pm from Maynooth Harbour. Wednesday 13th June is Bike to Work/Bike to School Day and we urge everyone to get on two wheels or even three.  Tuesday 12th June is a special occasion as we will be showing the Kildare film premiere of WHY WE CYCLE in the Glenroyal Hotel at 8:00pm (see below).

 

WHY WE CYCLE – KILDARE FILM PREMIERE

To the Dutch, cycling is as normal as breathing. They don’t think about it, they just do it. The documentary ‘Why we cycle’ features professionals from a variety of disciplines and ordinary cyclists. The film reveals some obvious as well as hidden effects of cycling on people, society and communities and shows the potential transformation of prioritising people over cars. It presents a vision for a healthy and active town which Maynooth could emulate and complements the ongoing Maynooth Health Checks.

KILDARE CYCLING OFFICER

Kildare County Council is in the process of employing  a new road safety/cycling officer. The post requires the successful candidate  to be able to drive – but not to be able to cycle which says a lot about the position of cycling in the Council.

I BIKE DUBLIN

Cyclists are angry in Ireland and in other countries – not just with increasing fatalities but also with poor quality infrastructure and lack of enforcement of parking legislation. I BIKE DUBLIN was set up to take direct action to protect cyclists. They do this simply by standing along the white line at the edge of the cycle lane to stop encroachment by cars. Prominent locations where they have taken this action in Dublin include St. Andrews Street in Dublin city centre and Ranelagh and follows similar protests in the UK, the USA and France.

CLIMATE CHANGE

Climate change hasn’t gone away you know! We were reminded of this recently when the former head of the European Commission’s Directorate-General for Energy warned that failure to achieve targets in the period up to 2020 are “a ticking exchequer time bomb”.

Furthermore, at a recent Irish wind energy conference, it was pointed out that if Ireland fails to meet climate change targets, the choice will be between multimillion euro fines or sending taxpayers’ money abroad to purchase emissions and/or renewables rights from 2020.

WORLD BICYCLE DAY 3rd JUNE

Finally, don’t forget that the 3rd June has been nominated by the UN as World Bicycle Day. So celebrate the occasion by getting out for a spin.

This is against a backdrop of even more authorities realising that additional cars in urban areas is bad. Last month, Los Angeles decided against adding lanes to a freeway, an unexpected move in a city that has mistakenly thought for years that more lanes mean fewer traffic jams. Despite expenditure of $1.6 billion on the expansion of Interstate 405 in Los Angeles and $2.8 billion on expansion of Interstate 10 in Houston to 26 lanes, the difference in travel times has been marginal.  In Germany, the highest court ruled that diesel cars could be banned from city centres to clean up the air. Meanwhile in Ireland, a decision by councillors in South East Dublin against a quietway show that Ireland is once again  lagging behind.

Maynooth Cycling Campaign is a non-party political cycling advocacy group. Further information on meetings and activities is available on our website.

We are affiliated to Cyclist.ie, the Irish Cyclist Advocacy Network and through it to the European Cycling Federation.

Bikeweek 2018

This year Bikeweek runs from 9th to 17th June and once again Maynooth  Cycling Campaign has organised a number of events to mark the occasion. On June 10th our historic cycle is the Tour of the Dead – visiting a number of the historic graveyards surrounding Maynooth. On Sunday 17th, the Family Cycle will be to Kilcock on the new Royal Canal Greenway. Both events start at 2:30pm from Maynooth Harbour. Wednesday 13th June is Bike to Work/Bike to School Day and we urge everyone to get on two wheels or even three.  Tuesday 12th June is a special occasion as we will be showing the Kildare film premiere of WHY WE CYCLE in the Glenroyal Hotel at 8:00pm (see below).

 

WHY WE CYCLE – KILDARE FILM PREMIERE

To the Dutch, cycling is as normal as breathing. They don’t think about it, they just do it. The documentary ‘Why we cycle’ features professionals from a variety of disciplines and ordinary cyclists. The film reveals some obvious as well as hidden effects of cycling on people, society and communities and shows the potential transformation of prioritising people over cars. It presents a vision for a healthy and active town which Maynooth could emulate and complements the ongoing Maynooth Health Checks.

 

Programme of Events

The full programme is available Programme 2018